Crawl Space Rodent Exclusion

The experts in crawl space cleaning, repair, rodent removal and prevention in the Portland/Vancouver metro area.

Licensed Contractor (#604-331-125)

Crawl Space Rodent Exclusion


Exclusion is the process of identifying and sealing all possible entry points that rodents can use to get inside your home. It begins with a thorough inspection of your home and property. Issues like loose siding, rotting window sills and other seemingly small problems are all it takes for a rodent to find their way in. By eliminating easy access points, exclusion is one of the most reliable methods of preventing infestations. It blocks rodents that were away from the nest from returning, and it discourages newcomers from trying to find their way in.

Common exclusion repair sites include:

  • Obvious rodent holes
  • Vents and other openings
  • Windows and exterior doors
  • Foundations
  • Flooring
  • Drains and piping

Exclusion also makes trapping a quicker and less complicated process. Once the exclusion repairs are completed and other easy food sources are eliminated, it will take about a month for the trapping process to be completed. The food in the traps will be tempting, but rodents are skittish. It takes them a while to trust the traps. Once the traps consistently come up empty, the removal process will be considered a success.

Cleaning up in and around your home will help keep rodents from returning and gaining access. Things like cutting back branches that overhang your home, removing feeders from close access points to your home, storing firewood away from the exterior of your home and barns, removing vines that grow up the sides of your homes and sealing all food and pet food in plastic or metal containers are just some of the ways you can prevent rodents from intruding. And since neighboring homes can be at risk, it’s helpful to talk with your neighbors about how they too can prevent rodent infestation.

Did You Know?

Rats and Mice can gain entry into your crawl space through cracks and holes as small as 1/2 inch, or in other words, the size of a dime.

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